Remove algae and pond weed from water features

Remove algae and pond weed from water features

Remove algae and pond weed from water features to keep them looking at their best. Algae turns water an unattractive green. Natural solutions which won’t harm fish or wildlife, such as floating barley pads on the surface of the water or using liquid additives and extracts in the water to subtly change the water’s pH, making it unattractive to algae. But the best way to prevent it is simply to grow more pond plants: aim to keep about a third of the water’s surface covered so your plants out-compete the algae. You’ll find a fantastic selection of aquatic plants available here at the garden centre in Paston and Oundle; if you’re not sure which to choose, just ask our staff for advice.

Remove algae and pondweed

And make it a weekly task to remove as much blanketweed and duckweed as you can. A net is useful for sieving out duckweed; to remove blanketweed, get a garden cane and twist the blanket weed around the end before pulling it clear. Before composting, leave the weed next to the pond for an hour or two so that any creatures caught up in it can escape. With regular attention at this time of year, your pond can stay clear and beautiful for you to enjoy all year round.

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