3 DIY ideas to replace your Christmas decoration

Replace your Christmas decorations with ligthsAfter the festivities are over and it’s time to take down the sparkly decorations and Christmas tree, the house can feel a little bit bare. As soon as the Christmas tree has been removed, there is extra space and when the lights come down, it can feel less glitzy. It’s perfect to do some DIY at this time of the year as the evenings are darker and we need to fill in the gap between Christmas and Spring. We’ve put some ideas together to give you some fun DIY goals for the new year!

 

1. Replace your Christmas decorations with lights

There is no need to be without fairy lights until next Christmas. Don’t pack them away and instead, gather lots of dried branches to wrap your fairy lights around. You can stand them tall in a corner of the room, or if they are smaller, place them with the fairy lights into a glass bowl or vase. This will give you a lovely display of twinkly lights all year around. Or, if you do want to pack the lights away, why not spray your branches with glitter or coloured spray paint.

 

2. Paper stars can replace your Christmas decorations  

Christmas is full of stars, but there is no need to be without them even in the less festive months of the year. Stars always brighten up a room and a really easy DIY project is to cut paper stars out of any colour paper you like, punch a hole in the middle and thread them on to the string. Make a knot below the paper star on the string so it doesn't fall down and repeat so you have as many stars as you like on the piece of string at equal distance apart. Then hang them up wherever they will look pretty. You could go sparkly or white with different colour string. The options are endless!

 

3. Replace your Christmas decorations with these this candle idea

We often put candles on our tables at Christmas but they are great for all year around. A lovely DIY idea is to personalise your own candle by placing a large candle in a pot of your choice with enough room around it to fill with moss and other foliage. The great thing about this is you can fill it with whatever you like at any point of the year. So you can have an ongoing DIY project to replace with winter, spring, summer and autumn themed foliage and flowers. This time of year is great for moss, twigs and pinecones.

 

For some great DIY inspiration have a look around our garden centre, you never know what you might find!

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