What to do in the garden in March?

In March, you can practically feel life flooding back into the garden. Spring bulbs are flowering and buds are appearing on branches. It’s a glorious time to be out of doors, watching the new gardening year begin again, and here are a few jobs for you to be getting on with this month.

 

HelleboresWhat to prune in March

If you haven’t already pruned your bush roses, do it now, before they really start to grow. Cut back shrubby dogwoods and willows to encourage the growth of new stems for brilliant winter colour next year. While you’re busy pruning, it’s also time to tackle forsythia, provided its finished flowering, as well as fuchsias and mophead hydrangeas.

Cut the old leaves off hellebores so that the flowers can be seen better – this also reduces the spread of disease. And deadhead your daffodils as they start to fade, but leave the foliage to die back naturally, so that the plants can build up food stores for next year’s flowers.

 

What to plant in March

There’s plenty to do in the vegetable garden, with onion sets and first early potatoes to be planted. Indoors, there’s still time to sow tomato seeds, as well as chilli and beetroot. Outdoors, you can sow carrots, parsnips and radishes.

In the flower garden, it’s all about hardy annuals – sow them towards the end of March for a riot of colour in early summer. (Here’s a handy tip – once weed seeds start to germinate, it’s warm enough to sow your hardy annuals.) For late summer colour, plant gladioli and dahlia bulbs in pots and keep them in greenhouses until the frosts are over.

Five hardy annuals to sow in March:

  1. Love-in-the-mist (Nigella damascena)
  2. Californian poppies (Eschscholzia californica)
  3. English marigolds (Calendula officinalis)
  4. Cornflowers (Centaurea cyanus)
  5. Godetia (Clarkia amoena)

If you have large clumps of snowdrops in your garden, it’s a good idea to lift and divide them to stop them getting too congested. Using a spade, dig up the whole clump, then tease it apart by hand into smaller clumps for replanting.

 

Feeding and mulching

Weeding As your plants start to grow, they need to be fed. Feed roses with a balanced fertilizer now for extra-special flower power in summer, and top-dress containers by scraping off an inch or so of old compost and replacing it with fresh.

Hoe borders to get rid of any weeds, then apply a thick layer of compost as a mulch (make sure the soil is moist first). This will help suppress weeds, keep in soil moisture, add nutrients and improve drainage – what more could you ask?

As the garden comes back to life, it’s the ideal chance to spot any gaps that need filling, or just to give your garden a new look. Pop down to your local garden centre for ideas, inspiration and everything else you need for your garden this year.

You might also be interested in:

Create a special something for Mother’s Day

The one day of the year we celebrate Mothers everywhere, will soon be here and it’s a day to recognise, appreciate and thank the special lady in our life. You could go for an exclusive meal or a girls day at the spa but nothing is more appreciated than a handmade gift for Mum. There is something special about the time and effort spent on a gift made at home and you won’t be short of ideas if you read on…

Read more...
Home trend: Geometric Shapes

Geometric shapes are a great way to help create bright and modern interiors. If used well, they can give a perfect balance with interesting fabrics and accessories, adding a harmonious touch to home interiors. The modern edges of geometry provide a contemporary touch and it’s becoming more popular all across the world. But how to use geometric shapes in your home and how do to involve plants in the design style? Have a read through these ideas to get you started! 

Read more...
What can we learn from Piet Oudolf?

There is a lot about planting and garden design that we can learn from Piet Oudolf, his romantic and naturalistic approach to planting large landscapes is special and different to many other designers, which is why he is so influential in the industry. His style can be replicated in any size garden with some tweaks here and there for size but the natural drama and colour he creates for all year interest is second to none. Take a look at some of his work in places such as The Millennium Garden at Pensthorpe Natural Park to Battery Park in New York, also the High Line in New York to County Cork Garden in Ireland. So what can we learn from Piet Oudolf?

Read more...
3 ways you can join Garden Re-leaf Day

Greenfingers Charity Garden Re-Leaf Day is a popular event which is held annually and helps to raise much-needed funds to transform the lives of children spending time in hospices across the country. The magical gardens created at these hospices bring much-needed respite and joy to children and their families lives. This year is the eighth Garden Re-Leaf Day on Friday 22nd March 2019 and there are many ways you can get involved from organising walks, cycling challenges along with quiz nights, raffles and cake sales. Here are a few ideas! 

Read more...
Source: Green Fingers Charity